You’ve Got the Love(social)

Written by on August 18, 2011 in cause marketing, Entrepreneurship, PR+Social Media, World - 1 Comment

If someone told the five-year-old me — who had just immigrated from Iran to Vancouver — that one day, I would have this palm-sized tool would let me connect with the whole entire world, I would have cocked my untamed little Persian eyebrow and said, “Oh, really now?”

That someone would proceed to tell me this magic tool would, within seconds, let me voice my opinion, rally around the things I believed in, bring attention to things that mattered and learn about just about anything with a whole community of incredible people.

Even at that age, I would be hard pressed to think that such a world would be possible. Alongside many, I was born in a place where your opinion is not something that you should can share with everyone—or anyone for that matter. I was born in a place where there politics, ego and inequality is the power in question. Many today still call such a place home and do not have the luxury to tweet about their lunch, the cool new thing they found online or a cause they are supporting. They cannot find their long-lost friends online, connect with new ones or keep a tab on developing world issues.

If you are reading this article, you are lucky enough to live in a world where you have internet access, can digest new information, share that information and be part of a growing collective.

My startup Lovesocial has seen just how powerful social can be. We have worked on campaigns from the global clean water crisis, the threats of hydraulic fracturing and emergency relief after the flood in Pakistan. We have worked with companies to be better through social, to learn how to create a two-sided conversation and to balance value propositions.

We wanted to create a short video that would put the power of social in perspective. We wanted to do this for a few reasons.

Firstly, since the time I started Lovesocial, we have seen an alarming saturation of spam and unthoughtful communication in the social space.

Secondly, I am petrified that we are forgetting just how special this pocket in history is. Today, for the first time in human history, advertising is not a one-sided conversation. The community openly participates in the conversation and can chime in, pushing companies to be better, policies to be iterated and conglomerates to be smarter. Individuals have the option to gravitate towards the things that we actually need.

Every individual has a power of magnitude that is awe-inspiring. I hope that this video reminds you of just that.

Azita

Azita Ardakani is the founder of Lovesocial: a social media agency that works with causes and corporations to utilize the power of social media to affect change, while being effective and authentic in online communication.

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  • James

    Azita, I’m fascinated by social media and think the
    perspective that Love Social brings to it is great. As you noted there was quickly an over saturation
    of unthoughtful communication. Social
    media is potentially extremely powerful, but being ubiquitous doesn’t
    necessarily translate to meaningful action.
    Not much power is being harnessed if most chatter is about Lady Gaga’s
    new hair cut and people trying to
    contribute to a productive dialogue are drowned out in spam.

    I’m wondering what are your organizations views and
    practices. How do you get the right
    people in touch and keep conversation productive? Should (can) organizations provide a filter
    without diminishing the free flow of communication that makes social media so
    powerful?

    Someone sustainability web journal just told me that trying
    to keep track of news in sustainability is like taking a fire hose to the face
    every morning. There is just too much
    going on, it not organized or distilled, there no consensus of what’s working
    or what’s not, and including everyone in the debate means the conversation never
    gets past the basics instead of expanding the knowledge base. I image Lovesocial faces many of the same
    problems in whatever social issue is being engaged. Sorting through these dilemmas while honoring
    free speech and participation are the biggest issues in the future of social
    media. Does Lovesocial have any
    perspective to offer on it?